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FAQ
  • 1. What's the difference between the SAT and the ACT?
    We're so glad you asked! The new digital SAT is here and there is A LOT to know about it. It the most well-designed college admissions exam to date – and your child SHOULDN’T take it in 2024. Please CLICK HERE to view the webinar we hosted in July 2023 to find out more. In the webinar, we cover: The format of the new SAT, including specific sections, question types, and patterns Why your child SHOULD prep for the new, digital PSAT The format of the current ACT, and how it differs from the new SAT Which test your child should take, depending on their individual strengths How the digital, adaptive format may negatively affect your child’s test performance When your child should start to prep for the SAT or ACT Why “test optional” does not really mean “test optional” How to set a goal score for your child A final note on helping your student decide which standardized test is best for them: the ACT recently rolled out a digital version. Do not take it! It is not well executed and there are currently many issues with it. Take the PAPER ACT instead!
  • 2. Which exam should my child take?
    Currently, we are strongly advising all of our students to take the PAPER ACT during this transition year. We do not recommend taking the new digital SAT. See the answer to the question above (and view the webinar for more information!). We absolutely do not recommend the digital ACT! ​
  • 3. Does my PSAT score matter? Why study for the PSAT?
    Most people think of the PSAT as just “practice.” It’s not. ​ While PSAT scores do not get reported to colleges, the PSAT is the qualifying test for National Merit Scholarships. If an eleventh-grader scores well on the PSAT, he/she can become a semifinalist for a National Merit Scholarship—something that looks very good on a student’s resume when applying to colleges. ​​ If your son or daughter intends to apply to Ivy League or other highly selective colleges, it’s a good idea for them to do some preparation for the PSAT.
  • 1. What's the difference between the SAT and the ACT?
    We're so glad you asked! The new digital SAT is here and there is A LOT to know about it. It the most well-designed college admissions exam to date – and your child SHOULDN’T take it in 2024. Please CLICK HERE to view the webinar we hosted in July 2023 to find out more. In the webinar, we cover: The format of the new SAT, including specific sections, question types, and patterns Why your child SHOULD prep for the new, digital PSAT The format of the current ACT, and how it differs from the new SAT Which test your child should take, depending on their individual strengths How the digital, adaptive format may negatively affect your child’s test performance When your child should start to prep for the SAT or ACT Why “test optional” does not really mean “test optional” How to set a goal score for your child A final note on helping your student decide which standardized test is best for them: the ACT recently rolled out a digital version. Do not take it! It is not well executed and there are currently many issues with it. Take the PAPER ACT instead!
  • 2. Which exam should my child take?
    Currently, we are strongly advising all of our students to take the PAPER ACT during this transition year. We do not recommend taking the new digital SAT. See the answer to the question above (and view the webinar for more information!). We absolutely do not recommend the digital ACT! ​
  • 3. Does my PSAT score matter? Why study for the PSAT?
    Most people think of the PSAT as just “practice.” It’s not. ​ While PSAT scores do not get reported to colleges, the PSAT is the qualifying test for National Merit Scholarships. If an eleventh-grader scores well on the PSAT, he/she can become a semifinalist for a National Merit Scholarship—something that looks very good on a student’s resume when applying to colleges. ​​ If your son or daughter intends to apply to Ivy League or other highly selective colleges, it’s a good idea for them to do some preparation for the PSAT.
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